Category Archives: womens collegiate wrestling

King University Women’s Wrestling Takes 4th Straight Title

The Queens of women’s collegiate wrestling once again comes from King University.

This past weekend the WCWA women’s college national wrestling tournament took place in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Teams from 32 universities and colleges from across the country were represented.

The four-peat came with three champions from the Bristol, Tennessee based King University, lead by 2016 Olympic Team member Haley Augello. Augello, who took home the 116 pound title, was one of two wrestlers to three-peat as champion in the tournament. King’s Marina Doi (101lbs) and  Breonnah Neal (109lbs) also took home championships.  Forrest Molinari (170lbs), Jessi Kee (143), and Regina Doi (101lbs) took home second place medals.

The other three-peater was Kayla Miracle of Campbellsville University, who took the 136 title.

Simon Fraser University took second place in the team championships, only trailing by 17 points. They crowned 2 champions in Mallory Velte (143lbs) and Payten Smith (191lbs).

Here are the complete results:

Individual Titles

  • 101lbs – No. 1 Marina Doi (King) dec. No. 2 Regina Doi (King), 5-0
  • 109lbs – No. 1 Breonnah Neal (King) dec. No. 2 Amy Fearnside (Jamestown), 4-1
  • 116lbs – No. 1 Haley Augello (King) dec. No. 3 Cady Chessin (Menlo), 8-3
  • 123lbs – No. 4 Andribeth Rivera (Campbellsville) dec. No. 3 Dominique Parrish (Simon Fraser), 10-10
  • 130lbs – No. 2 Cheyenne Youngblood (Missouri Baptist) dec. No. 1 Megan Black (McKendree), 10-3
  • 136lbs – No. 1 Kayla Miracle (Campbellsville) TF No. 3 Nicole Depa (Simon Fraser), 10-0
  • 143lbs – No. 1 Mallory Velte (Simon Fraser) TF No. 2 Jessi Kee (King), 10-0
  • 155lbs – No. 1 Tamyra Mensah (Wayland Baptist) TF No. 2 Niauni Hill (Lindenwood Belleville), 10-0
  • 170lbs – No. 1 Jessika Rottier (Cumberlands) dec. No. 2 Forrest Molinari (King), 8-1
  • 191lbs – No. 2 Payten Smith (Simon Fraser) fall No. 1 Paige Baynes (Lindenwood), 2:52

Team Results

1. King University 187.5
2. Simon Fraser University  170.5
3. Campbellsville University 153.0
4. Wayland Baptist University 142.5
5. Menlo College 124.5
6. McKendree University 115.5
7. Oklahoma City University 110.5
8. The University of the Cumberlands 107.0
9. Missouri Valley College 81.5
10. Southern Oregon University 76.0
11. Missouri Baptist University 71.5
12. Emmanuel College 60.0
13. Life University 51.0
14. Warner Pacific College 45.5
15. Eastern Oregon 44.5
16. Jamestown University 44.0
17. Lindenwood University 33.5
18. Grays Harbor College 33.0
19. Lindenwood Belleville 28.0
20. Southwestern Oregon Community College 26.5
21. Lyon University 26.0
22. Ferum College 20.0
23. Ottawa University 20.0
24. Midland Lutheran College 12.5
25. Bacone College 10.5
26. MacMurray College 10.0
27. Adrian College 9.5
28. Waldorf University 8.0
29. Lafayette University 5.0
30. Pacific University 2.0
31. Brewton-Parker 0.0
32. Wentworth Military Academy 0.0

Kings University “Queens” of Wrestling for Third Straight Year

IMG_0859_RotatorIn what has become a dynasty in women’s collegiate wrestling, King’s University rolled to their third national team title, defeating  Oklahoma City University by 17.5 points.

King’s three individual champions, sophomore Marina Doi (101), senior Samantha Klingel (116) and junior Forrest Molinari (155), were first time winners.

Continue reading Kings University “Queens” of Wrestling for Third Straight Year

King Univiersity Takes Another Women’s Wrestling Team Title

kings u 2015 wrestling
King University

For the second year in a row, King University stands atop of the collegiate women’s wrestling world.

The women’s wrestling powerhouse scored 269 points to take the team title. Campbellsville University, in only their second year as a program, takes the runner-up spot with 196 points, beating well established Oklahoma City University by a single point.

Four King wrestlers took home first place finishes, with three repeating their title; sophomore Haley Augello (116), senior Sarah Hildebrandt (123), and senior Julia Salata (155). Senior Amanda Hendey (143) would take home her first national title.

Marina Doi (101), Hanna Grisewood (123), and Jessi Kee (130) took home second place finishes.

King would also take “Academic Team of the Year”, and “Coach of the Year” in Jason Moorman.

The big story is Emily Webster of Oklahoma City University. The senior made history being the first four-time undefeated champion in Women’s College Wrestling Association history. She got her 118th win with her 10-0 technical fall over Doi at 101 pounds.

Webster was named “Wrestler of the Year” for that feat.

All ten #1 seeds won championships.


Here are the complete results:

Team Standings

  1. King, 269 pts.
  2. Campbellsville, 196
  3. Oklahoma City, 195
  4. Simon Fraser, 172
  5. Lindenwood, 145
  6. McKendree, 114
  7. Wayland Baptist, 113
  8. Univ. of the Cumberlands, 98
  9. Jamestown, 95
  10. Missouri Baptist, 88
  11. Missouri Valley College, 64
  12. Menlo College, 61
  13. Ottawa, 35
  14. Southwestern Oregon CC, 32
  15. Lyon College, 25
  16. Waldorf College, 25
  17. Lindenwood – Belleville, 17
  18. Life, 16
  19. Pacific Univ., 14
  20. Warner Pacific College, 12
  21. Midland, 3

Individual Tiles

101 pounds

  • Championship Match: Emily Webster (Oklahoma City) tech. fall Marina Doi (King Univ.), 10-0
  • Consultation Match: Darby Huckle (Simon Fraser) forfeit over Vanessa Smith (Wayland Baptist)

109 pounds

  • Championship Match: Cody Pfau (Oklahoma City) pin Abby Lloyd (Simon Fraser), 2:50
  • Consultation Match: Grace Paxton (Univ. of the Cumberlands) pin Breonnah Neal (King Univ.), 5:13

116 pounds

  • Championship Match: Haley Augello (King Univ.) tech. fall Diaysha Moore (Lindenwood) , 12-2
  • Consultation Match:  Amy Fearnside (Jamestown) dec. Shelby Morrison (Oklahoma City), 7-6

123 pounds

  • Championship Match: Sarah Hildebrandt (King Univ.) dec. Hanna Grisewood (King Univ.), 8-0
  • Consultation Match: Tarkyia Mensah (Wayland Baptist) tech. fall Bree Rapoza (Missouri Baptist), 12-1

130 pounds

  • Championship Match: Jacarra Winchester (Missouri Valley) dec. Jessi Kee (King Univ.), 2-0
  • Consultation Match:  Brieana Delgado (Oklahoma City) dec. Rosemary Flores (Campbellsville), 2-1

136 pounds

  • Championship Match:  Kayla Miracle (Campbellsville) dec. Shai Mason (Jamestown), 4-0
  • Consultation Match: Monica Ramirez (Lindenwood) dec. Forrest Molinari (King Univ.), 6-4

143 pounds

  • Championship Match: Amanda Hendey (King Univ.) pin Kayla Aggio (Oklahoma City), 1:07
  • Consultation Match: Cheyenne Youngblood (Missouri Baptist) dec. Hannah Gladden (Campbellsville), 6-3

155 pounds

  • Championship Match: Julia Salata (King Univ.) tech. fall Hanna Hall (Campbellsville), 10-0
  • Consultation Match: Bailey Halvorson (Simon Fraser) dec. Alexis Porter (McKendree), 7-3

170 pounds

  • Championship Match: 1st- Victoria Francis (Lindenwood) pin Ashley Miles (McKendree), 2:07
  • Consultation Match: Lorrie Ramos (King Univ.) pin Nahiela Magee (Wayland Baptist), 1:12

191 pounds

  • Championship Match: Tiara Scott (Campbellsville) dec. Brandy Lowe (Ottawa), 11-8
  • Consultation Match: Payton Smith (Simon Fraser) pin Jackie Williams (King Univ.), 1:24

Artemis Film Festival to Spotlight Women’s Fight Documentaries & Films

 

artemis-film-festival 3There has been many films that have covered female fighting in one form of another for the past fifty years; from documentaries to major motion pictures.

The new millennium and the increase of female participation in combat sports has saw growth in to many of these stories being told.

The Artemis Film Festival is looking to highlight these stories as they are currently working their first event for April 2015.

They have started an Indie Go Go campaign to help get the event going.

We talked to the organizers Sean Newcombe and Melanie Wise about their inspiration for the festival and how women’s combat sports have been a big part of it.


Wombat Sports: How did the idea of the Artemis Film Festival come about?

Artemis Film Festival: The idea came about through inspiration, really. We have all been devoted to female action films from the standpoint of the sheer joy we have for physically strong female characters, but also from the standpoint of our passion for having a positive effect on the image of women in film and culture. We’ve all been completely focused on writing and creating female action films. We thought that having a film festival focused on female action heroes would allow for people who share our passion for strong female characters to celebrate this genre. We also felt it would be an opportunity to spotlight the power of women in our culture.

We wanted the festival to be a place where the legions of fans who love female action heroes could go and enjoy a array of great films in one place and at one time. (Female action films are a $3 billion industry, so this is not a niche.) The fact that such a festival had never been done before boggled our minds.

By showcasing such films, we could also draw attention to women as heroes, fighters and leaders, rather than as long-suffering wives, dutiful assistants and victims. We hope that we could help change the narrative of how women are portrayed in film.

Lastly, film often reflects and influences how we see ourselves, and celebrating these films, we hope, will help positively influence how women and girls perceive their power and status in culture.

Wombat: Can you tell us about the festival?

Artimis: We plan to show both classic female action films such as “Aliens” and “Kill Bill” and also showcase new films by unknown filmmakers in our festival competition. We want to be a venue that encourages new and unknown filmmakers to make female action films. If there’s an outlet for such films, they are more likely to be made.

We are also going to have an awards ceremony for films in competition and give awards to the women who are both pioneers and stars in female action films made by Hollywood. We have sent many invites to well-known female action stars and expect to hear from them soon. Also, we want to honor stuntwomen, athletes (women’s mma, of course) and female first-responders, such as military women.

W.S.: The culture has shifted in both entertainment and sports in term of female roles. What are you thoughts about the societal change?

AFF: There’s has been a shift in reality, in our everyday lives, but there has not necessarily been a shift in how that reality is portrayed in the media. While Hollywood has recently realized the power of the female action film market, they’ve been slow to broaden their portrayals of women to reflect the dynamism and power that can be seen in women in every aspect of our culture. We hope that our festival will help prod a faster shift to not only more roles for women in film (right now less than one out of every three speaking characters in a Hollywood movie, on average, is female), but to stronger, better roles for women.

W.S.: What kind of reaction have you seen among the female fight community?

AFF: The response from women, generally, has been extraordinary! The women we’ve heard from both in social media and in daily life has been completely positive, passionate and vocal.

With respect to the women’s mma community, we have not heard a lot, unfortunately. We’d love to hear more from them because we are huge supporters of womens mma! We love the sport and we’d love to celebrate it at our festival. Women’s mma is at the forefront of positively shifting societal images of female physical power. (Invicta FC and Tuf 20 are just two examples of that positive shift.) We want to honor that.

W.S.: You have an indie go-go started to make this event happen. What benefits can people expect for supporting the festival?

AFF: They can expect to see a festival which will properly honors the female action genre in a manner it deserves. We’d like our festival to have as broad a reach as possible so that we can include as many of the great films and as many of the women who are part of this cultural gender shift as possible.

Our crowdfunding is intended to allow us to show more classic films, more films from new, unknown filmmakers in the competition and offer a chance to honor the kind of women we mentioned above. We’d also like to make sure that the experience of the people who attend the festival is as comfortable and enjoyable as possible.

By crowdfunding we feel that we can offer a broader, bolder festival.

W.S.: Anything you want to add?

AFF: We want this festival to be fun, but we also want to open minds. The empowerment of women is at the center of what this festival is about. It’s the soul of it, in fact.

Also, we’d like to say that we love your blog and are big supporters of women’s combat sports!

Thank you for allowing us to talk with you about our festival!

Nichole Teering Talks “The Weigh” and Cutting for Fights

10966918_10153034319372389_1818070136_nIt has been the one complaint that will always linger in MMA.

Fighters not making weight is probably one of the most debated topics recently, as several just can’t make the drop to a promised weight class. Some may not be suited to go down further, but some have been unable to cut properly to be on weight and look and feel healthy doing it.

Dr. Nichole Teering is hoping to help in the latter case in her new book “The Weigh”. Teering’s background in nutrition and alternatrive medicine has found a more natural way of losing pounds so fighters can be their best and recover after hitting the scales. She has helped several fighters include WMMA prospect Erin McDougall make weight on a consistent basis.

We took some time talk to Teering about the book and issues we have seen in weight cutting.


Wombat Sports: How did the book come about?

Dr. Nichole Teering: The reason for publishing this book was because as a nutritionist for athletes I could not stand to watch fighters put their bodies through such turmoil prior to battle. I began making programs to lessen the impact of starving and dehydrating. I became very busy customizing plans so I decided to make it accessible to the masses by publishing a book for purchase.

Wombat Sports: What is the most common mistake a fighter does when cutting weight?

Dr. Teering: The most common mistakes I see when fighters cut weight is that they are very extreme about the entire process. A) They believe they need to starve and dehydrate in order to make weight, and B) they are always in a rush to do it. They go from heavy training and eating accordingly then suddenly minimal training and drastically reducing calories. Then sweating too many pounds; or worse (laxatives) to finish off the cut.

W.S.: Is there any signs that a weight cut isn’t working?

Dr. T: Signs that a weight cut might not be working are that the athlete simply isn’t losing the required pounds, or things look like they are going in the right direction and then suddenly the fighter bloats at the wrong time.

W.S.: Can you talk about the complications in cutting with women versus men?

Dr. T: The biggest complication for women cutting weight as opposed to men is that there is a hormonal shift that happens once per month with females. Women can tend to retain more water at a certain time per month. If this happens to start during the weight cut then modifications are necessary.

W.S.: There are times when fighters never seem to make weight and aren’t even close. When do you feel there is a line between trying to cut and simply going up a weight class? 

Dr. T: Good Question! I personally feel if it is that hard to make weight and the fighter has attempted various ways of making weight with failed results then its time to go up a weight class. I truly believe that weight does not equal strength within a weight class. If the fighter knows how to access his or her true strength, that few extra pounds an opponent might have in the cage is not going to make a difference.

W.S.: People have different metabolisms and may have certain healthy conditions that causes them to lose weight slow or keep weight on. How important is it to know your body and what things in the book do you have to address it?  

Dr. T: This protocol helps the fighter to understand their oxidizer type which helps to understand how they can customize exact macro nutrients to suit their metabolism. Everyone is different so they need to find what works for them.

W.S.: What makes your techniques different than others?

Dr. T: The biggest difference in the technique you will find in The Weigh Protocol is that it is a more gradual process in comparison to other techniques. It is broken into 5 phases and gives the athlete a chance to experience how they respond to a more optimal way of making weight. It is designed with the athletes long term career in mind.

W.S.: What feedback have you been getting from your book and techniques?

Dr. T: The feedback thus far has been tremendous! Competitors are finding it easier and easier to make weight each time they attempt this protocol.

W.S.: Anything you want to add?

Dr. T: As with any new technique I highly recommend a practice cut before it is implemented prior to a fight. With slight modifications, I have also provided this technique to many other athletes with a weight cut component in their sport.

—-

You can find out more about Dr. Teering by going to NewPathHealth.ca or check her out on facebook.

 You can buy “The Weigh” here.

Help us Create a New Wombat Sports

writers-wantedAs I explained in my open letter, I am looking to change Wombat Sports to what it was initially meant to be. I can’t do this on my own, and that;s where you come in.

We are looking for contributors to help with writing articles and covering certain combat sports. You would also get to interview talented athletes in those sports.

The main contributors we are looking for is in women’s boxing, Muay Thai, freestyle wrestling, and BJJ. (We already have some people interested in covering the WMMA portion of the site). The cool things is I have the tools to gain news and info for these sports, just not the time to write it up. You can “learn on the job” if you aren’t an expert on these topics; but being curious is the key thing.

You can learn more about what I am expecting and what benefits come with being a part of Wombat Sports here.

Women’s College Wrestling Continues Expansion with Five New Teams

Freshman Kiaya Van Scoyoc of Warner Pacific University
Freshman Kiaya Van Scoyoc of Warner Pacific University

The extraordinary expansion of women’s wrestling continues this year as five more colleges have added wrestling teams for this coming season.

Among them:

  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Life University (Georgia)
  • Lyon University (Arkansas)
  • Ottawa University (Kansas)
  • Warner Pacific College (Oregon)

This starts what will be a three year expansion, with sixteen more teams to be added on the collegiate level according to National Wrestling Coaches Associations. The hope is more females will also lead these grapplers as coaches.

This year 220 female wrestlers will join the collegiate level teams and it doesn’t look like it will slow down anytime soon. Many girls interested in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and possible making the leap to MMA are seeing wrestling as an outlet to hone their skills. More and more states are hold women’s championships including California, Oregon, Guam, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Texas, Hawaii, and Washington.

This years WCWA National Women’s Wrestling Finals Tournament will take place at Missouri Baptist University in St. Louis, MO February 13.

For more info check out USA Wrestling Weekly’s show here.